Enogen, Tech Boost Ethanol, Corn Producers’ Profits

syngenta-enogen-nascar-15-johnsonCombining its own patented process for converting the corn kernel fiber into cellulosic ethanol with Syngenta’s Enogen corn, specially bred for ethanol production, Quad County Corn Processors (QCCP) is boosting its bottom line, as well as the profits for local growers. During an interview at the American Ethanol 200 in Iowa, CEO Delayne Johnson explained they use the alpha amylase enzyme already in Enogen corn with their own process to enhance the production of ethanol.

“When we combine the two technologies together, the benefits of [Enogen and the technology] allows plants to get up to 15 percent additional throughput, reduce energy content by 10 percent, and it also allows them to get all the benefits out of [both technologies combined],” he said.

Delayne added the $1 million a year his company doesn’t have to pay for the alpha amylase enzyme it would have had to add to ethanol production allows it to pay premiums to local farmers.

“It’s been fantastic for continuing to turn the dollars in rural America.”

Listen to all of Chuck’s interview with Delayne here: Delayne Johnson, CEO of Quad County Corn Processors

2015 American Ethanol 200 Presented by Enogen Photo Album

Coverage of the American Ethanol 200 sponsored by Enogen
Coverage of the American Ethanol 200 is sponsored by Enogen

Enogen ‘Primes the Pump’ for Ethanol Infrastructure

syngenta-enogen-nascar-15-tingleSyngenta’s Enogen seed corn, specially bred just for ethanol production, is “priming the pump” for infrastructure to keep the green fuel flowing. Previously, Syngenta announced a major donation to the Prime the Pump fund, an industry initiative to help early retail adopters of high-level ethanol blends through grants to reduce their initial investment in infrastructure. During an interview with Chuck at the American Ethanol 200 in Iowa, Chris Tingle, Head of Marketing for Enogen said approximately $600,000 will be raised for the initiative by contributing $1 for every acre planted with Enogen corn enzyme technology.

“[This allows for] the adding of equipment and enabling the use of ethanol more broadly,” he said, adding they’re getting some help from FFA students there. “We’re happy to partner with the FFA to support Prime the Pump. For every dollar the local FFA chapter collects here at the race, we’ll match.”

Chris went on to explain that the valuable enzyme in Enogen corn adds value for the ethanol plants and the farmers who grow it. Another important feature to know about Enogen is it doesn’t have to be a 100 percent blend of the variety when ethanol is made for it to be effective. “It’s really only about 15 percent of the overall corn that needs to be Enogen corn that needs to go into that [ethanol] plant to make the [maximum efficient use of the enzyme].”

Listen to more of Chuck’s interview with Chris here: Chris Tingle, Head of Marketing for Enogen

2015 American Ethanol 200 Presented by Enogen Photo Album

Coverage of the American Ethanol 200 sponsored by Enogen
Coverage of the American Ethanol 200 is sponsored by Enogen

Soules Supports Ethanol & Ag at American Ethanol 200

syngenta-enogen-nascar-15-soules1He’s been a guy handing out roses to the ladies on “The Bachelor” and wowing everyone with his fancy footwork on “Dancing with the Stars.” Now, Chris Soules says he just a “normal famous guy” back home in Iowa supporting agriculture and getting back to what he loves: farming. He recently served as the grand marshal for the American Ethanol 200 and talked to Chuck at the race about the importance of ethanol and how Syngenta’s Enogen corn seed, bred especially for ethanol production, is an key part of the food and fuel products coming from American farms.

“This is an exciting event for me,” he said. “We’re promoting Enogen corn that’s helping build the ethanol industry and adding value back to the farmers. It’s exciting to have a platform that helps farmers connect with the consumer and tell the story of ethanol and how important it is to Iowa’s and the entire U.S.’s economy.”

Soules knows firsthand how much value ethanol has added to corn. He remembers the days when we had $1.30 a bushel corn, and while the prices are down a bit now, they’re still better with the ethanol market. He also pointed out how farmers are making feed and fuel for America and the world. “Having that diversity in our energy is really important. Keeping that market is something we need to work hard to do.”

Listen to Chuck’s interview with Chris Soules here: Chris Soules at American Ethanol 200

2015 American Ethanol 200 Presented by Enogen Photo Album

Coverage of the American Ethanol 200 sponsored by Enogen
Coverage of the American Ethanol 200 is sponsored by Enogen

Corn Growers to Protest EPA’s Ethanol Cuts

rallyforruralamerica1Corn farmers are going to make their voice heard on the Obama Administration’s cuts to ethanol. The National Corn Growers Association says producers from more than a dozen states are expected to turn out at a public hearing and rally in Kansas City, Kansas, this Thursday, protesting the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) proposal to slash nearly 4 billion gallons of corn ethanol from the Renewable Fuel Standard through 2016.

“Last time, we were very clear to EPA about what we wanted,” said NCGA President Chip Bowling. “It is simple: EPA should follow the statute. For farmers and others in rural America, this new EPA proposal means low corn prices and ethanol plant and industry cutbacks. And for everyone, it means higher gas prices and dirtier air.”

All farmers who can make the trip are encouraged to attend the hearing and public rally, with free bus transportation provided from several points across four states – Kansas, Missouri, Nebraska and Iowa. The buses are scheduled so growers can depart and return the same day, and free food and refreshments will be provided.

A rally in conjunction with the public hearing will kick off at 11:30 a.m. at nearby Huron Park, with several prominent agriculture, business and political leaders talking about the importance of renewable fuels for rural America.

RFA Supports American Agri-Women

AAW Drive TruckThe ethanol industry is supporting women in agriculture. The Renewable Fuels Association and Syngenta, maker of ethanol friendly Enogen corn, join a growing group of sponsors of the American Agri-Women Drive Across America. The nation’s largest coalition of farm, ranch and agri-business women, is celebrating 40 years of advocating for agriculture with its “Drive Across America.”

AAW President Sue McCrum and other leaders will drive in a specially wrapped pick-up truck, participating in educational, network and advocacy events hosted by AAW’s more than 50 affiliates. The Drive will finish at the 2015 annual convention in Portland, Maine.

Winner of American Ethanol 200 Presented by Enogen

Winner American Ethanol 200The winner of the 2015 American Ethanol 200 presented by Enogen is Erik Jones. This is his fifth victory in 26 NASCAR Camping World Truck Series races and first in 2015.

The photo is Erik’s team along with the folks from Syngenta/Enogen. The winner’s circle is THE place to be! In my photo album I’ve got over 300 photos from today’s activities that I hope you will enjoy and share.

It has been a long day so I’m calling it quits now. However, expect to see and hear more from Iowa Speedway this coming week. I have a number of interviews to share that I think you will enjoy.

2015 American Ethanol 200 Presented by Enogen Photo Album

Coverage of the American Ethanol 200 sponsored by Enogen
Coverage of the American Ethanol 200 is sponsored by Enogen

RFA Names New Communications Director

rfa-jacksonA man with a professional background in ag communications is the new communications director for the Renewable Fuels Association. The group says Tony Jackson, a former Director of External Affairs for the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Farm Service Agency and counsel for the U.S. House Agriculture Committee, is also a graduate of Boston College Law School.

“We are thrilled to have Tony joining our remarkable team,” said RFA President and CEO Bob Dinneen. “With his extensive communications and policy background, Tony will be a tremendous asset to RFA in its efforts to tell the story of how the U.S. ethanol industry is bolstering rural economies and assisting our nation to become more energy independent.”

“I am excited about the opportunity to be a part of the RFA team,” Jackson said. “I look forward to using my skills to amplify RFA’s voice, and to help our nation to become cleaner, safer, and more energy independent.”

Jackson will be responsible for developing and managing the full range of RFA’s communications efforts, including advocacy-oriented communications approaches, traditional and social media strategies, and brand awareness.

Syngenta Works with Iowa FFA for Ethanol

syngentaSyngenta is partnering up with Iowa FFA chapters to support ethanol. This company news release says the developer of the corn ethanol feedstock Enogen will be at the American Ethanol 200 with the FFA members to raise money and awareness for flex fuels – and the farm group.

The American Ethanol 200 is a 200-lap NASCAR Camping World Truck Series race honoring American-grown ethanol and presented for the third consecutive year by Enogen® corn enzyme technology. Money raised for flex fuel infrastructure by FFA members at the Iowa Speedway on race day will be matched by Syngenta, with a portion of the proceeds going to participating FFA chapters.

“Engaging the public about ethanol and renewable fuels is a good opportunity for my students,” said Miranda Johnson, advisor of the Twin Cedars FFA Chapter. “They are the future and they understand the importance of conservation and preservation of our land and resources – and the vital role farmers play in feeding and fueling our country.”

According to Jack Bernens, head of Enogen at Syngenta, the ethanol industry since its inception has had a profoundly positive impact on the U.S. economy and on rural America.

“Ethanol has enlarged and strengthened the market for American-grown corn, adding jobs in rural communities and spurring the innovation of new technologies,” he said. “Syngenta is pleased to again be partnering with local FFA chapters at the American Ethanol 200 presented by Enogen to help spread the word about the importance of American ethanol and the need for increased flex fuel infrastructure. It’s inspiring to see FFA members embracing renewable fuels and helping to tell its story.”

Bernens added that investments in flex fuel pump infrastructure are necessary to help grow the market for American ethanol.

Corn Growers Urge Comments on RFS

PrintThe Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has opened the public comment period on its proposal to cut corn ethanol in the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) by nearly 4 billion gallons. That’s prompting the National Corn Growers Association (NCGA) to urge farmers and their family and friends to email their opposition to this proposal as soon as possible, before the July 27 deadline.

“Last time, we were very clear to EPA about what we wanted,” said NCGA President Chip Bowling. “It is simple: EPA should follow the statute. For farmers and others in rural America, this new EPA proposal means low corn prices and ethanol plant and industry cutbacks. And for everyone, it means higher gas prices and dirtier air.”

This link while allow you to send a quick email: www.ncga.com/rfs. Various draft comments are available to enable both farmers and their non-farmer friends to easily send personalized notes to the EPA.

Save the Date – MN Biodiesel & Bioheat Forum

Save the date for the Biodiesel and Bioheat Forum taking place August 19, 2015 in Mankato, Minnesota.

Screen Shot 2015-06-12 at 9.39.12 AMStates up and down the East Coast have ventured into new markets and uses for biodiesel that offer significant potential for Minnesota and U.S. soybean farmers as well as the entire biodiesel industry. One market includes the Bioheat market – nearly 6.2 million homes rely on heating oil in the winter months. In fact, the average home can use more than 1,000 gallons in one winter.

The Minnesota Soybean Research and Promotion Council will host a delegation from the East Coast, as well as local and national biodiesel leaders. The group will include representatives from the New York Oil Heating Association, National Association of Oil & Energy Service Professionals, National Oilheat Research Alliance and the Massachusetts Energy Marketers Association, ready to share their experiences with biodiesel and explain the market potential in all arenas.

While much of the debate around biofuels revolves around future technologies and future uses, this round table discussion will look at opportunities available now for the biodiesel industry to grow and solidify its success.